Don’t Rock the Boat

don't rock the boatIt’s a delicate balance when NINE animals decide to pile into ONE little boat! This cute Noah’s Ark set doubles as a balancing game, complete with a paper plate game spinner.

animal game spinnerBut the best part about this story time? The author herself came to read! Check out our interview with Laura Sassi at the end of this post.

laura sassi readsWe read Goodnight Ark, written by Laura Sassi, and illustrated by Jane Chapman (Zonderkidz, 2014). It’s bedtime on Noah’s ark, and the animals are settling down for the night. Except for the boars. An incoming storm make them head to Noah’s bed for a little comfort. As the storm grows, the number of animals in Noah’s bed increases until the bed finally breaks with a big, splintering crash. Unfortunately, the noise startles the skunks, who react as only skunks can. Finally, by singing a lullaby, Noah gets everyone to sleep (and don’t miss the world’s most adorable sleeping tigers on the last page).

You’ll need:

  • 1 box (mine was 4 ½” X 4 ½” x 6″ – a small tissue box works too).
  • 2 large rectangles of brown poster board (mine were 5″ x 16″)
  • A selection of colored masking tape
  • A selection of construction paper
  • 1 paper towel tube
  • 6 toilet paper tubes
  • 1 small box for the elephant (I used a 2” x 3” x 3” box)
  • 1 small box for the turtle (I recycled 1″ x 2.5″ x 2.5″ tape roll box)
  • 1 circle of green poster board (mine was about 3.5″ in diameter)
  • 1 oval of green poster board (mine was 2.5″ x 3″)
  • A selection of eye stickers (optional)
  • A selection of dot stickers (optional)
  • Orange, white, and black pieces of self-adhesive foam (optional)
  • 1 animal game spinner, printed on a 8.5″ x 11″ piece of white card stock
  • 1 small paper plate (mine was 7″ in diameter)
  • A box cutter
  • A small piece of red poster board for game spinner (mine was 0.75″ x 2″)
  • 1 brass tack
  • Stapler, scissors, tape, and hole punch for construction
  • Markers for decorating

First, the boat! Cut the tabs and lid off your box (or, if you’re using a small tissue box, cut the entire top off). Set the box aside for a moment. Use a marker to draw horizontal lines on 2 rectangles of brown poster board (these are the “boards” of your boat). For a nice pop of color, put a strip of colored masking tape at the top of each rectangle. If you don’t have colored masking tape handy, use a strip of construction paper or markers.

boat step 1Place both rectangles on top of one another, staple the short ends together, and slide them over the box. Tape the rectangles to the sides of the box like so:

boat step 2Finish by adding some portholes to your boat! We used 1.25″ color coding labels from Avery (first seen in this bottle airplane post), but you can draw the portholes on with marker if you’d prefer.

finished boatNext up, the animals! To add texture and variety, we used eye stickers, dot stickers, self-adhesive foam, and a piece pipe cleaner. But you could also keep it simple and draw these features on with markers.

Also, since this was a stacking game, we didn’t add too many details. While I was dying to put cute little construction paper ears on everyone, they would have interfered with the stacking. Likewise with tails.

There’s quite a bit of tube wrapping in this project, and there are quite a few tubes! Since tube wrapping usually takes kids the longest, you might want to do all or part of the basic tube wrapping in advance (ex: wrap all the tiger tubes with orange paper).


Wrap a paper towel tube with yellow construction paper. To make the head, fold a 2″ x 6.5″ piece of yellow construction paper in half, and use scissors to round the folded end a bit. Add eyes, nostrils, and mouth before attaching it to the tube with tape. Tape a fringed, 1.5″ x 11″ piece of brown construction paper on the tube. Add spots with markers!


Wrap a toilet paper tube with orange paper. Add eyes, a nose, a mouth, and two ears. Add stripes. We used self-adhesive foam strips, but you can use construction paper or markers.


Cut the turtle’s body shape from green construction paper. Draw a pair of eyes on the head. Glue the body to a small box. Draw a shell design on an oval of green poster board and glue on top of the body.


Wrap a toilet paper tube with construction paper (we couldn’t resist using this patterned feather paper in the art supply cabinet). Add eyes and a beak made of self-adhesive foam (or construction paper).


Wrap a toilet paper tube with red construction paper. Then, wrap a smaller piece of black paper around the top. Add eyes, a nose, a mouth. Finish by drawing spots!


Wrap a toilet paper tube with brown paper. Add eyes. We used a large yellow dot sticker to make a mouth, and then overlapped a smaller dot sticker on top of it as a nose. Draw a curly tail on the back with a marker if you’d like!


Cut a circle of green poster board into a spiral, then use markers to add stripes and eyes.

polar bearPOLAR BEAR

Wrap a toilet paper tube with white construction paper, then add eyes, nose, ears and mouth.


Wrap a toilet paper tube with black paper. Add eyes, nose, mouth and ears. Stick a white oval of self-adhesive foam on the front as a tummy, and two strips on the back of the tube as skunk stripes (or just use construction paper).


We pre-cut 3 pieces for the elephant – 2 squares of gray construction paper to cover the  front and back of the box and 1 nose. The square that covers the front of the box is slightly modified to include two ears. Add eyes, mouth, details inside the ears, and lines on the nose. Glue (or tape) the nose to the box. Draw a tail on the back with markers.

OK! You have your boat and your animals. All you need now is the game spinner! Cut an animal game spinner from the template, and glue it to the underside of a paper plate (i.e. the part of the plate that is normally resting on the table). Use a box cutter to cut a slit in the center of the circle, making sure to cut all the way through the plate.

Make a spinner arrow out of poster board, and punch a hole in the non-pointy end. Thread a brass tack through the hole in the arrow, then push the tack through the slit in the spinner and the plate. Open the prongs of the tack, making sure to leave them just a little loose so the arrow will spin freely.

animal game spinnerTo play the game, empty out the boat. Then spin the arrow. Whatever animal the arrow points to gets placed in the boat. Keep spinning until all the animals are stacked in the boat (if you land on an animal that is already in the boat, just keep spinning). If you get all the animals stacked in the boat, you win! But if any of animals fall down while you’re stacking them, you have to start the game all over again.

I know that technically, there should be 2 of each animal on the ark. Since that would have resulted in some serious tube wrapping, we decided that the animals on the spinner would serve as the matches for their tube counterparts.

We had a fabulous time, and Laura was a truly charming reader. She also brought a basket of skunks with her. Yes, a basket of skunks! Read on for more details!

laura sassiPlease tell us a little about yourself!

I am former teacher who is now lucky enough to be able to spend my days writing and being mom to our two kids. When my kids were little, I wrote while they napped. Those stories, crafts, and poems can now be found in various children’s publications including Highlights for Children, Spider, Ladybug, and Clubhouse Jr.

Over the years, I discovered that I had a special passion for rhyme and telling humorous stories in rhyme, so when my kids started school, I started to add rhyming picture books to my daily writing schedule. Goodnight, Ark, published by Zonderkidz and beautifully illustrated by Jane Chapman, is the first official fruit of all those years of writing and honing my craft.  I am also thrilled to share that my second picture book, Goodnight, Manger, also illustrated by Jane Chapman, made its debut today!

What inspired the writing of Goodnight, Ark?

Personal experience. We’ve had some ferocious storms in recent years and when my kids were little, they and the dog all wanted to climb into our bed. Getting them back to their own beds in the midst of howling winds and pounding rain, however, was challenging. With that as my spark, but thinking that ordinary kids and pets in an ordinary bed, might be kind of boring, I kept switching up the setting until it hit me: Noah’s ark!

During your read-aloud to the kids, you mentioned that sometimes, illustrators like to put surprises in the pictures for readers. This leads to a hilarious aside about underwear on a clothes line. Did you have much input on the illustrations for the book? The illustrations are gorgeous by the way…

I was thrilled when I learned that Jane Chapman was going to illustrate Goodnight, Ark. I was familiar with Jane’s work from Karma Wilson’s Bear Snores On series and knew she would do a fantastic job.  But, believe it nor not, the first glimpse I had of Jane’s work for Goodnight, Ark was when I got an advanced peek at the cover.  A few months later I received the folded galleys and saw for the first time Jane’s wonderful lantern-lit depictions of tigers and sheep, boars and quail all scurrying up to Noah’s bed.

Even though no direct input from me was involved, Jane’s illustrations demonstrate that a lot of thought went into transforming my words into pictures and extending the story with little bits of added humor throughout.  I’ll never forget my daughter giggling the first time we read through the folded galley and she noticed polka-dotted boxers hanging to dry on a clothesline and a toothbrush in a cup on the sill.

Was it difficult choosing which animals would be featured in the story?

It was not difficult at all.  I knew I wanted my story to rhyme, and so once I had my setting, it was actually fun to brainstorm which animals might pile in and what might happen when they overloaded poor Noah’s bed. I decided to choose animals that were a bit unusual such as wild boar and quail.  I also chose animals that made great sounds – like squawks and grunts.

You were great with the kids…and you brought skunk puppets! Tell us about the skunk puppets!

Since a pair of the little stinkers play an important role in the story’s resolution, and figuring that some of my very youngest readers might not be familiar with the species, I thought having a pair of skunk puppets would be a fun way to introduce the story. Jane Chapman has very expertly  incorporated two skunks onto (almost) every page of Goodnight, Ark and as soon as my skunky companions challenge the kids to see if they can find the skunks on every page, everyone is ready to have a rollicking good time reading.

Afterwards, and I should have anticipated this, littlest ones invariably want to pet the skunks.  And as they do,  I ask kids what their favorite animals were in the story or answer any questions they, or their parents might have. Indeed, the skunks have been such a great hit, that I’ve decided to incorporate a puppet- this time a very loud rooster – into the readings for my next book as well.

What do you enjoy most about reading to children?

I love the way kids, and small children especially, are so able to totally engage with the story. They rock when the ark rocks and tip when the ark tips. I love hearing their thoughts and answers as we sometimes pause to look into the story more deeply. As a former teacher, I sometimes miss this engaged, curious interaction, so I have been thoroughly enjoying this stage of post-publication where I get to read with kids.  I’ve always loved writing and I’ve always loved interacting with kids and now I’m getting to do both. I am a happy camper!

Your latest book, Goodnight, Manger, was released today. What are you working on next?

I have several more picture book projects in progress and I always have a few poems percolating. If your readers are interested in finding out the latest, they can check out my blog.  I’m also on Facebook and Twitter.

Photo of Laura Sassi used with her permission. Thanks for coming to our library Laura!


Workin’ at the Car Wash, Yeah

workin at the car wash yeahDrive your customized vehicle through our super-duper story time car wash! You will be misted, wiped, soaped, scrubbed, rinsed, and dried. We had some totally awesome tunes playing too…check out the video at the end of this post!

We read The Scrubbly Bubbly Car Wash, written by Irene O’Garden and illustrated by Cynthia Jabar (HarperCollins, 2003). The family car is dirty – it’s time to get it clean at the scrubbly-bubbly car wash! Fun illustrations and fantastic rhymes make this a great read-aloud. Here’s my favorite rhyme: “Steamy spray beyond the brushes / Rinse us down in luscious rushes.” Yes, yes, YES!

I used extra-wide magazine file boxes for my cars. But you can make a car out of anything really. Slap a couple of poster board wheels on a tissue box. Roll out your favorite toy car. Or pretend you’re a car and drive yourself through! The supplies and directions below are for a basic car, driver, and a bubble windshield.

You’ll need:

  • 1 box
  • 4 black poster board wheels
  • A section of colored masking tape
  • White poster board
  • Construction paper
  • A rectangle of tagboard or poster board
  • A rectangle of archival mylar (or transparency paper or clear cellophane)
  • 1 car wash (more on this later!)
  • Scissors and tape for construction
  • Markers for decorating
  • Hot glue

The boxes I used were left over from a major Rare Books vault move. I grabbed a couple dozen and transformed them into cars!

plain boxfinished carAs you can see in the above image, I attached 4 black poster board wheels, taped a tagboard “hood,” across the front, and added a bubble windshield (more on the windshield in a moment). I used 2 large embossed foil seals for headlights, and a piece of mirror board for the front grill. Katie used colored masking tape to add some awesome orange and black racing stripes. There were red sticker taillights on the back, and a mirror board bumper as well.

To make the car’s driver, cut an upper body outline out of white poster board. You can see the shape I used below. It’s tabbed at the bottom, so you can attach the driver to the floor of the car later.

driver templateDecorate your driver using markers and/or construction paper (I love using multicultural construction paper). Two strips of white poster board were added for arms, and the “hands” gripped a construction paper steering wheel. Hot glue (or tape) the driver’s tab to the floor of the car.

driver To make a bubble windshield, cut a frame out of tag board. There’s a simple trick for cutting frames out of heavy paper like tagboard or card stock (I learned it from a 2nd grade teacher). Soft-fold the paper in half, then cut a rectangle out of it.

cutting tag board frameWhen you unfold the paper, you have a frame! This is much better than the jab-a-pair-of-scissors-through-it-and-pray-you-don’t-stab-yourself method I used to employ.

windshield frameTape a piece of clear plastic inside the frame. I used mylar, but you can also use transparency film from an overhead projector (OfficeMax sells it) or clear cellophane. Next, use tape to attach the frame to the car. As you can see in the image below, I attached the bottom of the frame to the hood. The top of the frame curved over the driver’s head and attached to the back of the car.

finished carWe had a grand time decorating our cars and drivers. Just look at this fellow’s handsome driving cap! The stripes! The tape buttons down the front of the jacket! The green collar!

driving capFinally, it was time to bust out our story time CAR WASH!

car washThere were 6 different “stages” of the car wash. First came “Mist,” which consisted of strands of blue tulle hanging from the ceiling of the car was (you can see them in the above photo). Next came “Wipe.” These were big pieces of green felt dangling from the ceiling:

wipers in actionAfter the wipers came the “Soap” nozzles, which were 2 wrapping paper tubes with purple, green, and white tulle dangling from them.

soap nozzles in actionSoap was followed by “Scrub.” The scrub brush heads were 2 tag board rectangles wrapped with pink felt. I stuffed them with polyester fill to make them cushy, and used masking tape to attach the heads to 2 long pieces of PVC pipe.

brushes in actionIt should be noted that the Soap and Scrub portions of the car wash were operated by Katie and myself. As you can see in the below photo, that section of the car wash didn’t have a roof over it. That allowed us to reach in and soap and scrub the kids as they drove through.

dana and katie operatingAfter being scrubbed, cars went through a final “Rinse” (i.e. multiple strips of blue cellophane dangling from the ceiling) and emerged to “Dry” (2 box fans blowing on them). I recommend placing the box fans off to the side of the car wash, so little drivers don’t ram into them and knock them over.

If box fans make you nervous, have a story time helper stand with a big piece of poster board and fan the kids as they emerge from the wash. Also, make sure that all the car wash items dangling from the ceiling are at least 4″ off the ground. Otherwise, kids might get tangled in them and inadvertently yank them from the ceiling!

clearanceWe used 4 big boxes and lots of packing tape and hot glue to make the car wash. But you can also do a simplified version using 1 box, or the underside of a table. If you don’t want to go big, make a tabletop car wash for Matchbox cars.

As you can imagine, the car wash was a massive hit! We stayed open for business a good 30 minutes past story time, letting the kids drive through again and again. And, of course, we put “Car Wash” by Rose Royce on repeat play. Roll video!


Ice Cream, Thrice Tested

ice cream thrice testedTest three different methods for making ice cream? Yes please! When our kid tester pitched this idea to me, it didn’t take much convincing. After a little research, we decided to test the Young Chef Ice Cream Maker by Five Stars (retails for $20-$40), the Camper’s Dream Ice Cream Maker by UCO Industrial Revolution (retails for $25) and the Plastic Bags Method (2 plastic baggies! Woot!). Let the battle of the ice cream makers commence, Hope!

young chefHi everyone! First up is the Young Chef Ice Cream Maker by Five Stars. The ice cream maker came in separate pieces, which Dr. Dana hand washed and assembled at home. The set also contained 4 little plastic cups, 1 orange plastic serving spoon, 4 blue plastic “eating” spoons, 2 small containers with holes in the tops (for sprinkles, alas, none were provided in the kit! ☹), and directions in English, German, Spanish, Dutch, French, and Italian.

The machine consisted of a white, high-sided “bowl.” Suspended above the bowl was a resealable metal cylinder that sat on pegs. A blue plastic handle connected to one side of the cylinder. When you turned the handle, the metal cylinder spun on the pegs. There was also an orange plastic “scraper” that you could raise or lower to scrape your ice cream as it solidified on the cylinder.

young chef ice cream partsWe got started on the recipe. The directions were pretty hilariously translated from German. For instance, at the beginning of the directions it said: “Before starting, you have to read the instructions, which inform you about how to assemble your ice cream machine and use and clean it.”

Another example, from the end of the directions: “Put a biscuit, one you like, on a plate. Put a ball of your favorite ice cream on the biscuit. Put one more biscuit on top of the ice cream. You can now eat your ice cream sandwich or deep freeze it until another day.” PRICELESS!

The recipe was in milliliters and grams, so Dr. Dana had to use the handy dandy internet convert it to ounces and cups. Here’s the Young Chef Ice Cream Maker recipe:

4 oz cream
4 oz milk
2 tsp sugar
1 pinch of salt

Dr. Dana and I wanted to make sure that all of the ice cream recipes were as similar as possible. So even though the Young Chef directions called for regular salt in the cylinder, we used rock salt for all three recipes. We also used half and half in all the recipes as opposed to cream and milk in the Young Chef recipe. Once the ice cream ingredients were mixed, I put ice and 1/2 cup rock salt into the metal cylinder.

loading the cylinderThe directions said to pour hot water (!) into the cylinder with the ice. I was confused! Why hot water? But I followed the directions, and moved on. I put the cylinder in place above the bowl, which was holding the ice cream ingredients.

According to the directions, if I turned the cylinder around and around, the ice cream ingredients would freeze and solidify on the cylinder. When enough ice cream was stuck to the cylinder, the scraper could be used to literally undermine the ice cream, causing it to flake off into a plastic cup. Dr. Dana and I were deeply, deeply, skeptical of this method.

I started turning the cylinder around and around. It was VERY noisy. WHIR! CLANK! WHIR! CLANK!

The crank was kind of awkward, so Dr. Dana and I took turns spinning it around and around, until finally, the ice cream started solidifying. Yes, the machine worked! Basically, when the freezing cylinder passes through the liquid ice cream ingredients, some of it freezes and attaches to the cylinder. We used the scraper to ease the ice cream off the cylinder in a long, creamy ribbon.

ice cream ribbonOnce we had enough, we put it into bowls and grabbed some spoons, anxious to try our creation. Scooping up a spoonful we counted 1! 2! 3! Put it into our mouths, and…..

BLECH!!!! YUCK!!!!! GROSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!! IT WAS DISGUSTING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The yellowish ‘ice cream’ had almost no sweetness, and was watery. To be honest, it tasted like frozen milk. Yuck. The ice cream consistency was a little weird too, because it came off the machine in a ribbon. Oh and there were a lot of parts to clean up afterwards. The actual machine was cute though, and it worked.

Now for test #2, the Camper’s Dream Play and Freeze Ice Cream Maker by UCO Industrial Revolution.

camper's dreamThis ice cream maker was a blue plastic sphere with two chambers. One chamber was the outer part of the sphere (where the ice and the rock salt was poured in). The other chamber was a metal cylinder within the sphere (where the ice cream was going to be made). The sphere had two openings that lead to each chamber. I packed ice and 1/2 cup rock salt tightly into the outer chamber. It was hard to shove the ice in – I had to do it one cube at a time.

stuffing the iceI mixed up the ice cream ingredients and poured them in the inner chamber. Here’s the Camper’s Dream recipe:

1 pint half & half
1.5 tsp vanilla
1/3 cup + 2 tablespoons sugar

Then it was time for the fun (and noisy) part.

The whole point of the sphere shape was to play while making the ice cream.  I quote: “Shake, roll and pass it around as you mix and freeze the ingredients. You don’t need electricity, just have a ball!” Sadly however, Dr. Dana and I had to crouch on the floor and roll it back and forth, back and forth, because you could not (the directions stated) bounce or kick the ice cream ball. This was slightly disappointing, because rolling the ball around was a tad anticlimactic. However, the ice cream chamber had a little ‘window’, so I could check the progress of our ice cream, which was cool!

rolling the ballAfter rolling the ice cream ball around for about 10 minutes, we opened up the metal cylinder and scraped the sides as best we could. The directions called for a plastic spatula or wooden spoon. I used a wooden spoon, but the sides were super hard to scrape! I had to use the handle of my wooden spoon!

wooden spoonThen, as the directions suggested, we replaced the ice and rock salt in the outer chamber, as it was melting. We rolled the ball around for 7 more minutes. And shook it up and down too! (At this point, Dr. Dana and I were convinced that it was really a giant maraca with anger issues. It was SO DANG LOUD.) Nervous, (because of our past taste-testing experience) we unscrewed the inner chamber. Inside, we found a soft-servish liquid (it probably would’ve been thicker if we had shaken it longer). Scooping it into some bowls, Dr. Dana and I raised our spoons… and…

YUM YUM YUM YUM YUUUUUUMMMM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The ice cream was delicious, delectable, enticing, exquisite! Dr. Dana and I gobbled up a whole bowlful each.

Then we started to clean up our mess to prepare for the next (and final) testing. But when we tried to open the ice chamber, it was frozen shut! We tried to use the tool that came with the kit to open it. Not strong enough. We had to ask a passing gentleman to open it for us! Then we had to dump everything out of the ice chamber. NOISY! And messy. We had a glob of ice and rock salt sludge in the sink. Also, ice cream ‘puddles’ formed on the exterior of the maker.

getting messyIt was… messy. No. Not a little messy. It was catastrophically messy. Not a camper’s dream!!!! After finally finishing off the titanic disaster of a mess, grinning and licking up the excess ice cream in our bowls, we moved to the final ice cream method…the Plastic Bags Method.

plastic bagsSimple, and easy, all we had to do is put 1 pint-sized plastic bag inside 1 gallon-sized plastic bag. We put ice and 1/2 cup rock salt in the gallon bag, and here’s what went into the pint-sized bag (the recipe is from wikiHow):

2 tablespoons white sugar
1 cup half & half
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

ice cream bagWe zipped the smaller bag inside the bigger bag, and…noticed that the small bag was leaking. So we double bagged it. Then, as the directions suggested, I started shaking it up and down, while holding it inside a towel. The recipe calls for a towel or gloves and THAT IS DEFINITELY A GOOD IDEA. Holding an ice bag for 10 minutes is COOOOLD!

shaking the bagWe shook it for 7 minutes. Then 10 more. Then we pulled the smaller bag out and stuck our spoons in. It definitely had the best consistency, and it had decent flavor (we maybe could have used more sugar), but the winning super wowsie recipe was the Camper’s Dream Play and Freeze. Dr. Dana and I returned to our hoard of Camper’s Dream ice cream, and chowed down. By the way, cleaning up the Plastic Bags Method was a snap. Just toss everything in the garbage!


Young Chef Ice Cream Maker by Five Stars: 2 OUT OF 5
How ironic. This ice cream was not five stars, nor was the machine.

Camper’s Dream Play and Freeze Ice Cream Maker by UCO: 4 OUT OF 5
Delicious ice cream, kind of fun, the lid froze shut, SUPER LOUD!

Plastic Bags Method: 5 OUT OF 5
Good ice cream, fast to make, easy to do, cheap, quick clean up, good ice cream consistency.

Overall, the easiest and most effective method of ice cream making was plastic bags. The most delicious recipe came from the directions of the Play and Freeze Ice Cream Maker. Even so, the plastic bag recipe could be tweaked to match the Play and Freeze one. All in all, this was a most delicious testing! SPOONS UP!

(Hey Dr. Dana, I heard we had some ice cream left over….?) ;)
(Wait! Don’t tell the readers! They might invade the staff lounge!)

If you’re looking for a more earth-friendly version of the Plastic Bag Method, I spotted a cool, kid-friendly technique at a Colonial America demo. Stick a tall canister (or pot) with lid in a bucket of ice and rock salt. Add your ice cream ingredients to the canister, cover, and rotate briskly for 10-15 minutes (or until the liquids solidify). You might need to take the lid off once in a while to scrape the sides of the canister. No plastic needed!